October 13, 2020 | 12:30pm – 1:00pm EDT

Session 3.1
Where You Live Can Kill You: Neighborhoods and Environmental Justice

Keynote Address

Dr. Robert Bullard

Distinguished Professor, Texas Southern University

KEYNOTE: The Quest for Environmental Justice

Statistically, communities of color are disproportionately affected by environmental damage. Toxic living conditions and environmental racism helped inflate death rates among African Americans and other People of Color, even before COVID-19 struck. Communities of color have historically, experienced huge barriers to their right to fair housing choice, and they disproportionately face significant environmental injustice in their own backyards. 

Statistically, communities of color are disproportionately affected by environmental damage. Toxic living conditions and environmental racism helped inflate death rates among African Americans and other People of Color, even before COVID-19 struck. Communities of color have historically, experienced huge barriers to their right to fair housing choice, and they disproportionately face significant environmental injustice in their own backyards. 

 October 13, 2020 | 1:15pm – 2:45pm EDT

Session 3.2
The Intersection Between Fair Housing and Environmental Justice

Moderator

Claudine Ebeid McElwain

Senior Communications Manager, Southern Environmental Law

Environmental justice acknowledges that communities of color bear a disproportionate share of environmental harms and affirms the need for policies that clean up our communities, both urban and rural, to be in balance with nature, and provide fair access for all to the full range of resources. America is residentially segregated and so is pollution. Race and class still matter and map closely with environmental , unequal protection, and climate vulnerability.

Panelists

Natalie Ayers

Board Member, Lubbock Compact

John Relman

Managing Partner, Relman Colfax PLLC

Monique Harden

Assistant Dir. of Law & Policy, Deep South Center for Environmental Justice

Peggy Shepard

Co-Founder and Executive Director, WE ACT for Environmental Justice

 October 13, 2020 | 3:00pm – 3:45pm EDT

Session 3.3
A Clock Is Ticking: The Effects of Climate Change on Communities of Color

Moderator

Allan Lazo

Executive Director, Fair Housing Council of Oregon

Our planet is in imminent danger as global warming leads to rising sea levels, extreme heat, prolonged drought, more intense storms and wildfires and devastating floods. When the impacts of these changes are layered on a foundation of historic racial segregation, climate change exacerbates systems of inequality in the U.S. “Climate gentrification,” heat islands and extreme weather events disproportionately harm members of protected classes under the federal Fair Housing Act. These climate-related conditions and the economic upheaval they bring on impact communities of color first and worse, yet public policy around this issue has not provided workable solutions that will enable us to build more resilient – and also more equitable – communities.

Climate change and climate justice are not isolated issues; instead they require truly intentional and inclusive approaches to coalition-building and policy-making. If we ever expect to provide justice and equity for our communities, we must build cross-movement alliances and recognize climate justice as an intersectional civil rights issue.

In this session, panelists will examine climate change through a civil rights lens to demonstrate the need for collective action between practitioners of fair housing and climate justice.

Featured Conversation

Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Atmospheric Scientist, Professor of Political Science, Director Climate Science Center, Texas Tech University, CEO, ATMOS Research and Consulting

Dr. J. Marshall Shepherd

Distinguished Professor and Director, Atmospheric Sciences Program, University of Georgia

FEATURED PERFORMANCES

Pages Matam

International Artist, Writer, Event Coordinator, and Educator

Ebony Stewart

International Touring Poet and Performance Artist

 October 13, 2020 | 4:00pm – 5:15pm EDT

Session 3.4
Strategies to Ensure Housing and Climate Justice

Moderator

Keenya Robertson

President and CEO, Housing Opportunities Project for Excellence, Inc.

Our planet is in imminent danger as global warming leads to rising sea levels, extreme heat, prolonged drought, more intense storms and wildfires and devastating floods. When the impacts of these changes are layered on a foundation of historic racial segregation, climate change exacerbates systems of inequality in the U.S. “Climate gentrification,” heat islands and extreme weather events disproportionately harm members of protected classes under the federal Fair Housing Act. These climate-related conditions and the economic upheaval they bring on impact communities of color first and worse, yet public policy around this issue has not provided workable solutions that will enable us to build more resilient – and also more equitable – communities.

Climate change and climate justice are not isolated issues; instead they require truly intentional and inclusive approaches to coalition-building and policy-making. If we ever expect to provide justice and equity for our communities, we must build cross-movement alliances and recognize climate justice as an intersectional civil rights issue.

In this session, panelists will examine climate change through a civil rights lens to demonstrate the need for collective action between practitioners of fair housing and climate justice

PANELISTS

Cashauna Hill

Executive Director, Louisiana Fair Housing Center

Colette Pichon Battle, Esq.

Executive Director, Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy

Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr.

Founder and President, Hip Hop Caucus

Chione Lucina MuÑoz Flegal

 Managing Director, Policy Link